• 2x6_Cover_attempt_1

Nick Montfort

Nick Montfort lives in New York City and teaches at MIT. He is an author or editor of a dozen books and has developed, individually or in collaboration, more than fifty digital art and...

Serge Bouchardon

Serge Bouchardon is professor at the University of Technology of Compiègne (France). His research focuses on digital creation, in particular digital literature; as an author, he is interested in the unveiling of...

Andrew Campana

Andrew Campana is a poet, translator, and Ph.D. candidate in modern Japanese literature at Harvard...

Natalia Fedorova

Natalia Fedorova is a mediapoet, translator, and a curator of the 101 Mediapoetry Lab. She teaches digital art and creative writing with new media at St. Petersburg State...

Carlos León

Carlos León is a post-doctoral researcher at Complutense University of Madrid, studying computational creativity and the computational modeling of...

Aleksandra Małecka

Aleksandra Małecka is a translator and translation studies researcher who works with electronic, experimental and otherwise unconventional literature. She collaborates with the Kraków-based Ha!art Publishing...

Piotr Marecki

Piotr Marecki is assistant professor at the Jagiellonian University in Kraków and lecturer at the Polish National Film, Television and Theater School in Łódź. Since 1999 he has been editor-in-chief of Ha!art Publishing House,...

2×6

Nick Montfort

Serge Bouchardon

Andrew Campana

Natalia Fedorova

Carlos León

Aleksandra Małecka

Piotr Marecki

Literature, Translation | $17.00
ISBN 13: 978-1-934254-67-7
Size: 5.5 in. x 5.5 in.
Pages: 256
Binding: Softcover, Perfect
Published: October 2016

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2×6 consists of short “stanzories”—stanzas that are also stories, each one relating an encounter between two people. Appearing in English, French, Spanish, Russian, Japanese, and Polish, the stanzories are generated by a similar underlying process, even as they do not correspond to one another the way a translation typically does to a source text. These sixfold verses are generated by six short computer programs, the code of which is also presented in full. These simple programs can endlessly churn out combinatorial lines that challenge to reader to determine to whom “she” and “he,” and “him” and “her,” refer, as well as which is the more powerful one, which the underdog. Generating 2×6 is a simple process, and readers are invited to study the programs and even modify them to make new sorts of text generators. Reading the output can be much more difficult, as the text that is produced crosses syntax with power relations and gender stereotypes, multiplying those complexities across six languages.