• requiem_front

Teresa Carmody

Teresa Carmody is the author of Maison Femme: a fiction (Bon Aire Projects, 2015) and Requiem (Les Figues, 2005). Her chapbooks include I Can Feel (Insert Press, 2012),  Eye Hole...

Requiem

Teresa Carmody

Introduction by David L. Ulin
Cover art by Stephanie Taylor
Book 3 of 5, TrenchArt Material Series
Fiction | $15.00
ISBN: 0-9766371-3-8
Size: 9.25″ X 4.25″
Pages: 72
Binding: Tradepaper

CONTACT Les Figues directly to purchase this book

Requiem is a “folk opera, a lament for the unexamined life,” writes editor and author David L. Ulin in his Introduction, “marked throughout by its own quiet tone of authority, which works to peel back the surface of what we imagine and examine what is going on underneath.

Drawing out the elliptical plain talk of those who would refer to themselves as simple, using Biblical language to pierce the callous and bruised souls of these lost, and sometimes found, people, Carmody creates, says Ulin, “art as observation, a literature constructed of the most minute details, a lens that allows us to see.”


Praise for Requiem

“Like the difficult and necessary theological propositions embedded within the works of Flannery O’Connor and William Faulkner, Requiem suggests that perhaps, in the end, all we can do is see until we can’t anymore. Carmody’s darkly poignant illustration of this advocates that seeing—despite our fears, limitations, and distractions—may be one of love’s most sincere gestures.”

American Book Review

“Tone is often a stumbling-block for young writers (or any writer) but Teresa Carmody has boldly confronted the challenge by cultivating a voice straightforward yet smoky with homegrown dreams and griefs. It’s a voice out of a backyard burning bush, a Midwest scriptural mist: frank, fierce and fidgety, and most emphatically her own.”

—Carol Muske-Dukes

“[Requiem] operates out of an entirely American idiom, in which faith and credulity, spiritual yearning and the pettiness of human desire, bleed together, until often we’re not exactly sure just were we stand.”

—David L. Ulin, LA Times Book Review editor